THE ULTIMATE ENDURANCE TEST FOR THE SCHWALBE ONE

Europe's largest racing bike magazine, TOUR, has subjected the Schwalbe ONE folding tire to an endurance test. The editorial team covered 6,000 kilometres on the tire in Summer 2014. The results were published in the 12/2014 issue under the heading "IT ROLLS":

"The chase slowly but surely becomes a head-to-head race: Schwalbe's tire designers have made it their goal to challenge the leading position of Continental, the long-standing test winner in the racing bike category. With the new top model Schwalbe ONE, the tire experts from the Oberberg area are very close to achieving their goal. In the TOUR test (issue 12/14), the tire was only a few tenths of a point behind the best in the class, the GP 4000S and, apart from its high puncture resistance, impressed with its very good wet weather grip. In the meantime, a pair of tires with a width of 25 millimetres has been used for a whole cycling season and has proven to be a perfect allrounder. The wide tires provide a smooth ride, the steering behaviour is neutral. For a cyclist weighing 75 kg, a tire pressure of just under 7 bar turned out to be the ideal compromise between comfort and smooth running. Although lighter than the immediate Continental competitor, the ONE nevertheless has plenty of rubber on the tread, resulting in a respectable service life. The rear tire was puncture-free for almost 6,000 kilometres: it has become slightly angular, but is still well protected against cuts and small stones. As far as the front tire is concerned, apart from the puncture caused by the blackberry bush thorn in Southern Italy, the distance was covered with virtually no problems."

By the way, the Schwalbe ONE TUBELESS had already proven itself in another and quite spectacular endurance test. At the beginning of July 2014, the seven Schwalbe two-person teams rode with the new TUBELESS tires in the TOUR TRANSALP (7 stages, 822 kilometres, 19 passes, total elevation covered 19,318 metres) completely without punctures – a total of 11,508 extremely demanding alpine kilometres!

       

 

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